Child Support Attorneys

Rogness & Field specializes in Minnesota child support cases. Our experienced attorneys can help you navigate the process of establishing or modifying child support.

Under Minnesota law, child support is determined by considering both parents’ gross incomes, the amount of time each parent spends with the child, and the cost of child care and medical support for the child.

There are three areas of support that the court considers: basic support, child care support, and medical support.

Basic support is determined by taking the gross monthly income of each parent. The parties’ gross monthly incomes are then combined to determine the “Parental Income for Child Support”, or PICS. The percentage of each parent’s gross income contributes to the total PICS amount. The court will then multiply each percentage times the total combined child support obligation to determine each parent’s share of that obligation. After this is determined, a Parenting Expense Adjustment is applied. This is a credit for the amount of time the noncustodial parent spends with the child. The Parenting Expense Adjustment is determined by one of three categories:
  • If the obligor spends less than 10% of the time with the child per month, then there will be no adjustment.
  • If the obligor spends between 10% and 45% of the time with the child per month, then the child support obligation will be reduced by 12%.
  • If the obligor spends more than 45.1% of the time with the child, then the court will presume the parent’s time with the child is equal.

If there are childcare costs or medical support costs, the court will split these costs between the parents. This is typically split according to the PICS. To estimate a child support order, the Minnesota Department of Human Services has an online calculator that can be accessed at: http://childsupportcalculator.dhs.state.mn.us

Under Minnesota law, a child support order may be modified if there has been a substantial change in circumstances that makes the previously court ordered child support obligation unreasonable and unfair.
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